UK confirms intent to cull export tariff alongside FiT in future solar proposals | PV Tech

https://www.pv-tech.org/news/uk-confirms-intent-to-cull-export-tariff-alongside-fit-in-future-solar-prop

UK confirms intent to cull export tariff alongside FiT in future solar proposals

More in , , ,

Credit: BEIS

The UK government has confirmed it will close the small-scale feed-in tariff (FiT) on 31 March 2019 as planned and, crucially, close the export tariff to new installations at the same time.

This afternoon the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy released two separate documents; a consultation on the closure of the FiT and a separate consultation on the ‘Future of small-scale low carbon generation’.

Effectively seven months overdue, the two documents outline how the government intends to handle the closure of the feed-in tariff while requesting proposals on how the government may aid the market in a post-subsidy environment

Among the details included across the two consultations are;

  • A proposal to close the export tariff for newly-installed small-scale renewable generators alongside the feed-in tariff in March 2019;
  • No special provision for installations waiting for capacity in oversubscribed caps, impacting standalone solar installs;
  • A conclusion that there is no justification for reallocating un-used capacity between technologies and/or deployment bands;
  • A request for details as to how small-scale renewables can contribute towards the future electricity system and, in turn, ambitions detailed within the Clean Growth Strategy;
  • Requests for insight as to whether there is a need for the government to enable a competitive market-based route to market for small-scale renewables, including estimations on how much small-scale low carbon generation could be brought forward without support;
  • The prospect of a new export tariff in conjunction with further adoption of renewables in demand-side response.

This is a developing story and will be updated on PV Tech’s UK sister site Solar Power Portal.

Tags: uk, beis, fit

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo

UK solar deployment halved in 2017 following government’s ‘solar exit’

—-
UK solar deployment halved in 2017 following government’s ‘solar exit’
// Solar Power Portal – News

The UK’s solar installs across 2017 were less than half that of the previous year according to SolarPower Europe’s latest report, which has dubbed the UK “the only rainy” European country in terms of growth to 2022.
—-

Read in my feedly

RegardsRob Such
RS Renewables Ltd

Solar and wind could provide 60% of UK power without jeopardising reliability, study finds | Solar Power Portal

https://www.solarpowerportal.co.uk/news/solar_and_wind_could_provide_60_of_uk_power_without_jeopardising_reliabilit

Solar and wind could provide 60% of UK power without jeopardising reliability, study finds

Liam Stoker

Solar could play a pivotal role in a future energy system without jeopardising security of supply, a new report has revealed.

The report, produced by consultancy Vivid Economics in partnership with Imperial College academic Marko Aunedi, has analysed the role solar and onshore wind could play in the decarbonisation of UK power out to 2030.

It found that wind and solar, the two cheapest forms of renewable generation on the market today, could provide more than 60% of total electricity by 2030 which, combined with existing nuclear and natural gas capacity, would be capable of meeting demand.

While the UK needs to further decrease power sector carbon emissions – to a level of 100g CO2/kWh – critics have expressed concern over the variable nature of renewables and to what extent a more significant concentration of renewables could impact on the functioning of transmission and distribution grids.

But Vivid’s 2030 model seeks to ease those fears, claiming that the UK could turn increasingly to wind and solar without jeopardising system reliability.

The analysis used a future system comprising no generation from biomass and no new nuclear, gas or CCS facilities.

This system was then tested for its reliability using forecasted demand in 2020, 2025 and 2030, with four specific tests used to confirm system reliability. These included system adequacy, defined as the ability to meet demand at all times; system reserve, or whether there is enough ‘spare’ capacity to address unexpected stress events; an assessment on synchronous generation capacity to maintain system inertia above threshold levels; and a test on frequency response control capabilities.

The results of those tests concluded, according to both Vivid and Imperial College, that the UK can indeed meet system needs out to 2030 by combining both wind and solar with ‘smart resources’ such as battery storage and demand response.

Eric Ling, energy economist at Vivid Economics, said: “We now know wind and solar can meet most of the UK’s generation needs. This is great news given the challenges facing alternative power sources, such as biomass, nuclear and carbon capture.”

“Wind and solar, storage and demand response are now low-cost technologies, and capable of powering the electricity system in 2030. What is needed now is to ensure that markets deliver these at scale over the next decade,” Alex Kazaglis, head of energy and industry at Vivid, added.

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo