Decision for access to half-hourly electricity data for settlement purposes | Ofgem

Ofgem are finally going public on the real reason they want every home to have a smart meter – so you can be billed in half hourly chunks. This has always been the plan so why have an advertising campaign that pretends that smart meters will save consumers money by making them better informed about their energy consumption?

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/decision-access-half-hourly-electricity-data-settlement-purposes?utm_medium=email&utm_source=dotMailer&utm_campaign=Daily-Alert_25-06-2019&utm_content=Decision+for+access+to+half-hourly+electricity+data+for+settlement+purposes&dm_i=1QCB,6COIH,F31GLA,P47UT,1

Decision for access to half-hourly electricity data for settlement purposes

In order to settle customers half-hourly, suppliers need access to their customers’ half-hourly data from their smart meter. Under the current rules, domestic consumers’ half-hourly consumption data can only be accessed for settlement if they have given opt-in consent, and suppliers can only access half-hourly data from microbusinesses for settlement if they have not opted-out. As part of our work on market-wide settlement reform we have been considering the future of these rules, as well as other issues related to data access for settlement. In July 2018 we published a consultation seeking views on a number of questions, in order to realise t the benefits of settlement reform whilst ensuring that consumers’ privacy is appropriately safeguarded. Alongside the consultation document we also published a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA).

We have carefully considered the responses to our consultation and are now setting out our decisions, set out in this decision document. Alongside the decision document we are also publishing an updated version (version 2) of our DPIA, which reflects the decisions made following the consultation.

Regards,

Rob Such

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01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

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Solar farms could be wildlife havens that tackle biodiversity crisis | New Scientist

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2207491-solar-farms-could-be-wildlife-havens-that-tackle-biodiversity-crisis/?utm_medium=NLC&utm_source=NSNS&utm_campaign=2019-0626-GLOBAL-NSDAY&utm_content=NSDAY

Solar farms could be wildlife havens that tackle biodiversity crisis

Are solar farms good for biodiversity?Adrian Arbib/Alamy

By Adam Vaughan

Solar farms could help address the UK’s biodiversity crisis by providing habitats and food for wildlife, according to research gathered by a new project.

The online SPIES tool by the Universities of Lancaster and York found evidence from 450 peer-reviewed papers for actions solar farm owners can take to benefit nature, such as planting and maintaining hedgerows.

“There is limited research on the impacts of solar parks, hence the tool,” says Alona Armstrong of Lancaster University, who developed it with the solar industry, plus conservation groups, ecologists, landowners and the UK’s National Farmers’ Union. …

Regards,

Rob Such

rob07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

@rsrenewables

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Seven charts that explain what net zero emissions means for the UK | New Scientist

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2201416-seven-charts-that-explain-what-net-zero-emissions-means-for-the-uk/

Seven charts that explain what net zero emissions means for the UK

The Committee on Climate Change has urged the government to adopt a target of net zero emissions by 2050. These seven charts show how that might unfold, and what it means for the UK economy

Environment 2 May 2019

Universal Images Group North America LLC/Alamy Stock Photo

By Adam Vaughan

Here’s a selection of some of the most pertinent numbers that the Committee on Climate Change has compiled for the government in its report, ranging from expectations about the UK’s future emissions, sectors which it expects will emit the most greenhouse gases and some surprising numbers about the transition to electric cars.

The UK has already cut greenhouse gas emissions 40 per cent on 1990 levels, looking solely at “territorial” emissions, rather than ones based on consumption of imported goods and services. Before 2050, there are interim targets, including a 57 per cent cut by 2030, which the government admits it’s currently set to miss.

Previous cuts have been very uneven across the economy. The heavy lifting has been done by the power sector booting out coal in favour of more renewable sources and gas power stations. According to the most recent numbers, transport has replaced the power sector as the biggest emitter.

This chart shows the UK’s impact on global temperature, relative to now, from adopting a net zero target compared to today’s 80 per cent plan. As the line goes up, we are adding to global warming. As it goes down, the UK contributes to global cooling.

Today, farming and aviation are relatively small emitters compared to other sectors. But if the net zero target is achieved, their hard-to-treat nature means they will be the big two remaining rumps of emissions in 2050. That is why negative emissions measures are needed, such as tree-planting.

In the past, most of the emissions cuts have happened behind the scenes, through technological changes. Kettles still boil the same, regardless of whether powered by electrons generated from a coal power station or wind farm. This chart shows how more than 60 per cent of future measures require some sort of consumer behaviour changes too.

The government plans to ban new petrol and diesel car sales by 2040, but a 2030 goal would save more money, says the Committee on Climate Change. Switching to electric cars will cost society around £1bn a year in the early 2020s, in terms of costs of buying the cars, investing in energy networks and charging points. Later, they are expected to save the UK billions of pounds annually.

One of the Committee on Climate Change’s key findings is the cost of a net zero target will be the same as the existing one of an 80 per cent cut. That’s because the cost of technologies has fallen rapidly since the current target was enshrined in law 11 years ago. This chart shows just how much faster the cost of batteries has fallen than the group originally expected.

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
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The 2018 heatwave may not have been possible without climate change | New Scientist

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2199601-the-2018-heatwave-may-not-have-been-possible-without-climate-change/??utm_medium=NLC&utm_source=NSNS&utm_campaign=2019-0416-GLOBAL-NSDAY&utm_content=NSDAY

The 2018 heatwave may not have been possible without climate change

Environment 15 April 2019

The northern hemisphere experienced a long heatwave in 2018Tom Nicholson/Lnp/REX/Shutterstock

By Adam Vaughan

We know climate change made the heatwave that swept the northern hemisphere last year more likely, but is it possible to say that it actually caused it?

In a bold claim, researchers are suggesting the extent of the event would have been impossible without the carbon dioxide humanity has pumped into the atmosphere. Global warming appears to be caught red handed.

From record temperatures in Japan to wildfires in Sweden, many regions were hit by extreme heat between May and July 2018. A 5 million square …

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo

‘Unprecedented’ events send UK power market into negative pricing for six hours straight | Current N ews

https://www.current-news.co.uk/news/unprecedented-events-send-uk-power-market-to-negative-pricing-for-six-hours-straight

‘Unprecedented’ events send UK power market into negative pricing for six hours straight

Image: Getty.

25

Mar / 2019

12:28

UK wholesale power prices dipped into negative pricing for more than six hours yesterday following an “unprecedented turn of events” in the country’s supply and demand profile.

Yesterday (Sunday 24 March 2019) witnessed the UK’s system price dip to -£50/MWh from settlement period 21 (10:00 – 10:30am) and remain negative until 4:30pm as the country basked in unseasonably warm and bright conditions.

Indeed, Limejump’s energy trading team noted that the price fell as low as -£70.24/MWh during settlement periods 28 and 29, a steep decline that it attributed to the “shock effect of the sudden sunny weather” that sent the public outdoors and system demand falling in tandem, resulting in what the energy trader billed as an “unprecedented turn of events”.

Drax’s Electricity Insights Report has portrayed the event, showing the impact on the country’s wholesale price curve.

Image: Drax Electricity Insights.
Tweets from National Grid’s ESO Control Room Twitter account yesterday morning placed national electricity demand at 30.7GW at 10am and 31.2GW at 11am, a steep decline on the 34GW of demand recorded the previous Sunday.

This occurred at the same time as significantly higher than expected quantities of renewable power on the grid. Limejump noted that solar generation peaked at 7.7GW yesterday, far above the 6.5GW that was forecast and more than double the seasonal average of 3.5GW.

At the same time wind generation did not dip below 25% of supply from 5am onwards and, from 11am – 1pm, combined with solar to provide more than 49% of the country’s power.

Limejump added that the “black swan” event left National Grid with no option but to instruct power plants to turn down.

It’s not the first time the UK has witnessed wholesale prices dip into negative figures, with periods in both January and August last year witnessing negative pricing on the back of surging wind production.

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo

Zero Carbon Homes axe costing consumers three-times energy cap savings | Current News

https://www.current-news.co.uk/news/zero-carbon-homes-axe-costing-consumers-three-times-energy-cap-savings

Zero Carbon Homes axe costing consumers three-times energy cap savings

The Eddington development in Cambridge has seen significant amounts of rooftop solar deployed on new housing units despite the Zero Carbon Policy homes scrapping. Image: G&H Sustainability.
11
Feb / 2019
14:20

Former chancellor George Osborne’s decision to scrap the Zero Carbon homes policy is costing occupants of new-build homes more than £200 per year, essentially three times the targeted savings from Ofgem’s price cap.
New analysis from the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit has found that the policy move, one of the newly-elected Conservative government’s first in the spring of 2015, has cost owners of new-build homes £120 million in additional costs to date.
And that figure is set to rise to more than £2 billion by 2020 as further newly-built homes are occupied.
ECIU analysis has found that each new build home that’s occupied today will cost an extra £208 – 233 to heat, effectively three-times the average £76-per-year saving from the government-backed, Ofgem-enforced price cap.
The Zero Carbon Homes policy was due to come into effect in 2016, having been first announced in 2006 by then-chancellor Gordon brown. The policy would have ensured that all new houses would have had to generate as much energy on-site as they consume, dramatically slashing energy bills and delivering vital carbon emissions reductions from the built environment.
But the policy was scrapped just months before it was due to come into force, prompting angry responses from opposition parliamentarians and the energy and building sectors alike.
Ex-energy secretary Ed Davey, who became a staunch critic of Conservative energy policy having lost his seat at the 2015 election, described the scrapping of the Zero Carbon Homes policy as the “worst thing the Tories have done” in the autumn of 2015, comparing the decision against a packed field of clean energy cuts.
In addition, the ECIU points to the fact that carbon emissions from UK homes have in fact risen over the past two years, coinciding with a period of time in which the UK has lacked a comprehensive domestic energy efficiency scheme.
Jonathan Marshall, head of analysis at the ECIU, said that successive governments have struggled to devise effective domestic energy efficiency schemes, contrasting with the Zero Carbon Homes policu that “could have made a real difference”.
“As well as future-proofing new homes, the policy would have saved families money, reduced Britain’s vulnerability to energy supply shocks, and cut carbon emissions.
“Tackling new build homes is one of the easiest ways of improving the UK’s leaky housing stock, and reintroducing this policy could also deliver a boost to firms involved in insulation and low-carbon heating,” Marshall said.
His sentiments were echoed by Paula Higgins, chief executive at the Homeowners Alliance, who said that energy bills was one of the most regular concerns raised by consumers.
“One of our long-running campaigns is for better new-build homes; low standards, thin walls and inadequate heating are problems that we see time and again. Homes should be built to the highest standards to be fit for this and future generations; government and industry need to recognise that it’s in everyone’s interest to get this right.”

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo

Government confirms export tariff cull | Solar Power Portal

https://www.solarpowerportal.co.uk/news/government_confirms_export_tariff_cull

Government confirms export tariff cull

Liam Stoker
The export tariff will close to new applicants at the same time as the generation tariff, the government has confirmed, despite overwhelming opposition to the plans.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy confirmed in a response to this summer’s consultation today, claiming a fixed and flat-rate export tariff does “not align with the wider government objectives” of a move toward market-based solutions.

The feed-in tariff scheme will therefore now close in full to new applicants from 31 March 2019.

However, the government has noted responses to the consultation which stressed the need for a route to market for small-scale generators after the expiration of the scheme, and has committed to report on specific proposals for such arrangements “in due course”.

Furthermore, BEIS has also decided to implement some time-limited extensions proposed for all ‘MCS-scale’ – expressly defined as solar and wind systems with a net capacity of 50kW or less – that have not pre-registered as a school or community energy installation from 31 January to 31 March 2020.

Other conclusions reached in the consultation document include;

  • There will be no reallocation of unused capacity, said to be in line with the government’s commitment to keeping energy bills as low as possible;
  • Net costs of metered exports will be brought into the levelisation process, to be applied to metered exports from installations of all sizes into effect for FiT year 10 on 1 April 2019;
  • The average time-weighted system sell price will be used to determine the value of metered export to FiT licensees.

However, the government has said it will spend more time examining the possible effect of replacing older generating equipment with newer, more efficient panels, with a more detailed consultation set to follow.

Overwhelming negative response

The government said it received 345 responses to the consultation from industry stakeholders, and a staggering 315 – equivalent to 91% – disagreed with the export tariff proposals. With a total of 14 expressing no comment or answer on that specific proposal, just 16 – around 4.6% – said they were in support of the decision.

Neil Jones, campaigner at charity 10:10 Climate Action, said it was “hard to fathom” the government’s logic.

“Solar has been a huge success story, seeing a million homes and a thousand schools taking clean energy and climate action into their own hands.

“Yet the government has bizarrely decided to prevent new homes, schools and businesses installing solar after March from being paid for the energy they export to the grid. While coal fired power stations continue to profit, households wanting to go green will be left out of pocket.

“The government now has 3 months to fix this. It must choose whether it wants to back the public’s favourite energy source – solar – or instead push it off a cliff,” he said.

No U-turn from Perry

The decision may also come as a surprise to the sector considering some of the messaging from energy and clean growth minister Claire Perry in recent weeks.

When grilled on the subject by MPs from both sides of the despatch box in late November, Perry said it would be “wrong” for solar to be exported to the grid for free.

“I do completely agree that solar power should not be provided to the grid for free and that’s why I’ll shortly be announcing the next steps for small scale renewables,” the minister said at the time.

Merry Christmas,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo

Some 42% of the world’s coal generators run at a loss – pv magazine International

https://www.pv-magazine.com/2018/11/30/some-42-of-the-worlds-coal-generators-run-at-a-loss/

Some 42% of the world’s coal generators run at a loss

Carbon Tracker has released a report claiming it is cheaper, in many markets, to construct new renewable generation assets instead of running legacy coal-fired power plants. Billions could be saved for customers, while profits in the two-digit billion-dollar range look set to be lost by the coal industry.

With COP24 set to open its doors on Monday, the Carbon Tracker thinktank has published a report which demolishes one of the arguments the fossil fuel brigade cling to – the economic advantage of burning coal.

According to the report, rising fuel costs and the falling cost of renewable generation mean solar power is not just cheaper than coal, but that a considerable proportion of coal generation capacity is running at a loss.

The thinktank claims its report is the world’s first analysis of the profitability of 6,685 coal plants worldwide. The sample size represents around 95% of a globally operating coal generation capacity of 1,900 GW. The analysis also examines 90% – 220 GW – of the coal-fired power stations under construction.

In reviewing the data, the report’s authors found around 42% of global coal capacity is operating on unprofitable margins. By 2040, says Carbon Tracker, that figure could rise to 72%. The authors highlight high fuel costs, as well as carbon pricing and air pollution regulations, that are driving up the costs of coal generation.

New PV cheaper than business as usual

Moreover, 35% of the coal capacity currently online is more expensive to run than the cost of new renewable generation capacity. That means PV is not only cheaper on a new-for-new basis, it is also less expensive to build a new pv plant than continuing to fire existing coal-fired power stations, with that metric applying to the most expensive 35% of power stations today. The report’s authors say, as early as 2030, it will be cheaper to build renewable generation capacity than continue to fire 96% of coal generation capacity.

Carbon Tracker has calculated the potential savings for key markets. It says China could save $389 billion by closing coal plants up to 2030, while the EU could save $89 billion. The potential savings in the U.S. could reach $78 billion, and in Russia, $20 billion.

Matt Gray, head of power and utilities at Carbon Tracker, and co-author of the report, said: “The narrative is quickly changing from ‘how much do we invest in new coal capacity?’ to ‘how do we shut down existing capacity in a way that minimizes losses?’ This analysis provides a blueprint for policymakers, investors and civil society.”

According to the report’s authors, governments will have to choose between subsidizing coal or raising prices for customers. In many markets, governments are determining electricity prices through energy regulatory bodies. These are faced with either raising electricity prices – to the detriment of end consumers – to make coal profitable, or paying coal generators the difference to balance the books.

Phasing-out coal would save customers billions of dollars, says Carbon Tracker. If coal plants were phased out in line with the Paris Climate Change Agreement, coal companies in South Korea could lose $92 billion. In India the losses would amount to $76 billion and in South Africa, $51 billion.

Satellite imagery used to estimate coal power utilization

Sebastian Ljungwaldh, Carbon Tracker energy analyst and report co-author, said: “Our analysis shows a least-cost power system without coal should be seen as an economic inevitability, rather than a clean and green nicety.”

Globally, there are just over 2 TW of coal capacity operative or under construction. On average, coal generation in the EU is running at a loss of $10/MWh, with that loss set to grow to $32/MWh, according to the report.

In conducting the study, Carbon Tracker used what it described as a revolutionary method to assess profitability. The thinktank sourced satellite imagery to track plant activity, and deployed machine learning software to estimate each plant’s utilization rate. The group says the technique was checked against known data from the U.S. and EU, and found to be 90% accurate.

Meanwhile, Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables has released a report stating coal “will bear the brunt of an accelerated energy transition”. Its analysts foresee coal’s generation capacity halving by 2040, even without an international carbon pricing scheme.

David Brown, senior analyst at Wood Mackenzie, said: “The global energy transition will continue to progress, led in large part [by] technologies and decarbonization trends we’re already seeing in the marketplace – the rise of renewables, growth in electric vehicles, electrification of end-use demand, increasing efficiency.”

The market analysis group stressed the current trajectory, as well as a slightly accelerated scenario, are insufficient to support the less-than-2°C global temperature target set by the Paris Agreement.

Regards,

Rob Such

rob
07900 488 936
01344 988 775
www.rsrenewables.com

RS Renewables Ltd stores and uses personal data to be able work with you in relation to a contract we have/are working to put in place with you or the company you represent, or to investigate whether you would be interested in working with RS Renewables Ltd. Please see our i<a href="mailto:nfo